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November 29th, 2012

Is there no end to naming? Read more...Collapse )


Petrucelli grouped those 136 terms into 28 wider categories.[64] Most of these 28 wider categories can be situated in the White-Black continuum when the answers to the open-ended question are compared to the answers in the IBGE format:
Category                 Frequency                                                     
                                                     White    Brown    Black  Amerindian  Yellow    Total  difference between W and B

branca (White)                  54.28%  98,96%   0,73%    0,11%    0,07%       0,14%  100,00%    98,85
loira (Blonde)                      0.05%  95,24%   0,00%    4,76%    0,00%       0,00%  100,00%    90,48
brasileira (Brazilian)            0.12%  91,20%   6,05%    2,27%    0,00%       0,47%  100,00%     88,93
branca + (adjectivated White) 0.14% 86,47% 9,62%    0,00%    3,91%       0,00%  100,00%    86,47
clara (of light colour)          0.78%   86,40% 11,93%    0,35%    0,14%       1,18%   100,00%   86,05
galega (Galician)              0.01%    70,99%  19,78%    0,00%    0,00%       9,23%   100,00%   70,99
castanha (Brown)              0.01%   63,81% 36,19%     0,00%    0,00%       0,00%   100,00%  63,81
morena clara (light Morena) 2.92% 38,35%  57,12%    1,46%    2,27%       0,81%  100,00%   36,89
jambo                               0.02% 14,47%  77,96%     2,39%   5,18%       0,00%   100,00%   12,08
morena                           20.89% 13,75%  76,97%     6,27%   2,62%       0,38%   100,00%     7,48
mestiça, mista
(miscigenated, mixed)       0.08%  17,29%  59,44%   14,96%   7,60%       0,70%  100,00%       2,33
parda (Brown)                 10.40%   1,03%  97,25%     1,40%    0,21%      0,10%   100,00%     -0,37
sarará                              0.04%   9,09%  60,14%   23,25%    0,00%      7,53%   100,00%    -14,16
canela (colour cinammon) 0.01%  11,13%  57,55%   26,45%   4,87%       0,00%   100,00%   -15,32
mulata (Mulatto)               0.81%   1,85%  71,53%   25,26%   1,37%       0,00%    100,00%    -23,41
marrom, chocolate            0.03%   4,56%  57,30%  38,14%    0,00%      0,00%    100,00%   -33,58
morena escura (dark Morena) 0.45% 2,77% 54,80% 38,05%   4,15%       0,24      100,00%   -35,28
escura (of dark colour)      0.38%   0,59%  16,32%  81,67%    1,42%        0,00%   100,00%   -81,08
negra (Black)                   3.14%   0,33%   6,54%   92,62%    0,50%       0,02%   100,00%   -92,29
preta (Black)                   4.26%    0,37%  1,73%   97,66%    0,17%       0,06%    100,00%   -97,29

The other categories, except, naturally, for "amarela" (Yellow) seem related to Amerindian "race":

Category                    Frequency White Brown Black Amerindian Yellow   Total
vermelha (Red)                0.02%  58,97   8,22    0,00   21,56         11,24   100,00
cafusa                            0.01%   6,02  65,14  22,82     6,02           0,00   100,00
caboverde (Capeverdian)  0.02%   0,00  48,72  23,08   28,21            0,00   100,00
cabocla                          0.02%  3,60  49,37  10,43    36,60           0,00    100,00
bugre (Indian)                  0.00% 12,50 37,50   0,00     50,00           0,00    100,00
amarela (Yellow)             1.11%  3,27   0,98    0,24      0,15          95,36    100,00
indígena (Indigenous)      0.13%   0,44   2,12   0,00    96,13            1,30     100,00

The remarkable difference of the popular system is the use of the term "moreno". This is actually difficult to translate into English, and carries a few different meanings. Derived from Latin maurus, meaning inhabitant of Mauritania,[65] traditionally it is used as a term to distinguish White people with dark hair, as opposed to "ruivo" (redhead) and "loiro" (blonde).[66] It is also commonly used as a term for people with an olive complexion, a characteristic that is often found in connection with dark hair.[67] In connection to this, it is used as a term for suntanned people, and is commonly opposed to "pálido" (pale) and "amarelo" (yellow), which in this case refer to people who aren't frequently exposed to sun. Finally, it is also often used as a euphemism for "pardo" and "preto".[68]
Finally, the Black movement system, in direct opposition to the popular system, groups "pardos" and "pretos" in a single category, "negro" (and not Afro-Brazilian).[69] This looks more similar to the American racial perception,[70] but there are some subtle differences. First, as other Brazilians, the Black movement understands that not everybody with some African descent is Black,[71] and that many or most White Brazilians indeed have African (or Amerindian, or both) ancestrals - so an "one drop rule" isn't what the Black movement envisages.[72]

Race and ethnicity in Brazil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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