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July 15th, 2012

Daily Tao - 64

It's easy to maintain balance.
Trouble can be nipped in the bud.
Fragile things break easily,
and small things are easy to lose.

Deal with the situation
before it becomes a problem.
Keep everything straight
so it can't get messed up.

Every tree was once a seed.
Every skyscraper started out
with a shovelful of dirt.
And--stop me if you've heard this one before--
a journey of a thousand miles
begins with a single step.

When you try too hard,
you defeat your own purpose.
Cling to stuff,
and you will suffer loss.
The Masters make no effort,
so they never fail.
They aren't attached to things,
so they never feel loss.

People often screw up
when the job's nearly done.
Pay as much attention
to the finishing touches
as you do to the initial steps,
and you won't screw up like that.

The Masters try to be free from desire.
They don't collect precious things.
They don't cling to any beliefs.
They pay attention
to what everybody else ignores.
They help the world get right with Tao,
but don't try to change a thing.
-

The Beatrice Tao.

Daily Tao - 64
Bread and Roses  _ James Oppenheim

As we come marching, marching in the beauty of the day,
A million darkened kitchens, a thousand mill lofts gray,
Are touched with all the radiance that a sudden sun discloses,
For the people hear us singing: “Bread and roses! Bread and roses!”

As we come marching, marching, we battle too for men,
For they are women’s children, and we mother them again.
Our lives shall not be sweated from birth until life closes;
Hearts starve as well as bodies; give us bread, but give us roses!

As we come marching, marching, unnumbered women dead
Go crying through our singing their ancient cry for bread.
Small art and love and beauty their drudging spirits knew.
Yes, it is bread we fight for — but we fight for roses, too!

As we come marching, marching, we bring the greater days.
The rising of the women means the rising of the race.
No more the drudge and idler — ten that toil where one reposes,
But a sharing of life’s glories: Bread and roses, bread and roses.

Bread and Roses, by James Oppenheim « The Chawed Rosin

I
'm seven months late, but better late than never.
The textile workers strike at Lawrence, Massachusetts 
began on January 11, 1912.
The above poem, written a year earlier has been associated with the strike.
Legend says that  one of the woman picketers carried a sign that said:
We want bread, and
We want roses, too.

History Quiz

Though 100 years have passed, the Bread and Roses strike resonates as one of the most important in U.S. history. Like many labor conflicts of the 19th and early 20th centuries, the strike was marked by

 (a) obscene disparities in wealth and power,
 (b) open collusion between the state and business owners,
 (c) large-scale violence against unarmed strikers, and
 (d) great ingenuity and solidarity on the part of workers.

Which of the above is most likely to be absent in today's economic conflicts?

ZCommunications | Bread and Roses, 100 Years On by Andy Piascik | ZMagazine Article

PETITION

Originally posted by madman101 at PETITION
Originally posted by glitterophelia at [Signal Boost] Citizenship for Cerrina Foster? -
(Reposting and boosting from madman101 's post)

I felt the need to share this. This person is going through "statelessness." She was born to two American parents, but due to some document issues, and I guess DNA not being sufficient proof? She is not a US citizen. This affects education, health insurance, right to travel, a name, even her age. Please help by signing this petition and spread the word.

Thank you.

http://www.change.org/petitions/citizenship-for-cerrina-foster?utm_campaign=share_button_modal&utm_medium=facebook&utm_source=share_petition&utm_term=23783365



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