February 16th, 2011

A Canticle for Leibowitz Is Divine, But It's the Opposite of Science Fiction

And in the third ("Fiat Voluntas Tua"), the order has survived to see the modern world return — it's a far-future that resembles our near-future (or our near-future as envisioned in the 1960s), with global electronic communication and interstellar travel. War is brewing again, of the same kind that nearly destroyed humanity before, and the monks are taking steps to preserve our species' accomplishments. But ultimately: more death, more pilgrim, more buzzards.

Between those more obvious symbols and his little riffs throughout the book, it's unquestionable that what Miller wanted to show us was that, for all the external changes we experience, internally the human condition changes very little. Whether we're armed with bows and arrows, guns and sabers, or atomic bombs, there will be conflict and destruction and death; and it's all part of a cycle that's nearly as immutable as the law of gravitation. The technology is irrelevant.


A Canticle for Leibowitz Is Divine, But It's the Opposite of Science Fiction

The technology is irrelevant?  In fiction maybe!

For some reason or other i am in a dark mood, a mood i have long since learned not to share with other people.  So with the warning that not all that follows will be appropriate for all audiences, i put the rest of this post Collapse )